Meet Scott Mantooth: Assistant Coach and Student Conduct Board Coordinator

BY STEFANIE EGGLESTON
SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR

Whether he is coaching a runner or guiding a student to make the right choices, Scott Mantooth is always striving to improve the lives of those he meets. Mantooth is the new assistant cross country and track coach and coordinator of the Student Conduct Board.


Mantooth assumed the coaching position in August and the board coordinator position at the beginning of the spring semester. Mantooth has a master’s degree in guidance and counseling and volunteered for Westminster Head Cross Country coach Dave Tobey from 2008 to 2012.

scott-mantooth

According to President Benjamin Akande, as the coordinator of the Student Conduct Board, Mantooth will help students and organizations maintain accountability and resolve any potential conduct and policy violations.

“When issues arise concerning student misconduct, Scott will work with students to address concerns, seek informal resolution and, when necessary, oversee formal hearings, serving as advisor [sic.] to the Student Judiciary Board and Greek Judiciary Board,” Akande said in an email announcing Mantooth’s appointment.

“When issues arise concerning student misconduct, Scott will work with students to address concerns, seek informal resolution and, when necessary, oversee formal hearings, serving as advisor to the Student Judiciary Board and Greek Judiciary Board.” -Westminster President Benjamin Akande

In his new position, Mantooth will work closely with Interim Vice President and Dean of Student Life Dan Haslag to “promote student and campus organization success and accountability,” Akande said.

Haslag commented that Mantooth has been a “good fit” in student life and that the department members are “pleased to have [him].”

Mantooth said that both of his parents were deaf, so he grew up wanting to assist those who faced more barriers than most. He said that his first idea was to be a social worker, which led to 27 years working with the state of Missouri.

Working for Missouri’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, he helped people with disabilities find jobs. He also worked for the Department of Education and Department of Social Services.

“If you can be a service to others, that’s all you can ask for,” he said.

“If you can be a service to others, that’s all you can ask for.” -Scott Mantooth

Mantooth said that as coordinator of the Student Conduct Board, he now has the opportunity to “help students who probably made a decision that maybe wasn’t in their best interest.”

Meanwhile, he continues to coach Westminster’s runners.

Mantooth said that he turned to cross country as a coping mechanism when his parents divorced when he was 14.

“I think cross country saved my life,” he said.

“I think cross country saved my life.” -Scott Mantooth

He said that his high school cross country team was full of smart students who had high GPA’s and that he saw the group as a supportive team to turn to.

Mantooth went on to run cross country and track at Missouri State University, becoming an NCAA Division-II cross-country All-American. Mantooth also grew up playing baseball, basketball and football.

Even though Mantooth has been running since he was young, he did not participate in a marathon until he was 37 years old.

“I got tired of people asking if I’d done a marathon,” he said.

Mantooth completed the run in 2 hours, 39 minutes. That equates to an average of 6 minutes, 3 seconds per mile for 26.2 miles.

Now, Mantooth coaches the sports he participated in as a young man. He said that he prefers coaching for Division-III schools because Division-I and Division-II athletes are focused on keeping their scholarships, while Division-III students, who cannot receive athletic scholarships, play because they are passionate about the sport.

“If you’re not fast enough, DI and DII don’t want you,” he said.  “If you want to keep learning and developing, go to DIII.”

According to cross-country and track runner Kate Smith, ’20, Mantooth has done a great job recognizing students’ needs.

“He is very understanding as a coach,” she said.

Smith said that she looks forward to working with him again this spring.

When he is not helping students at Westminster, Mantooth spends most of his time with his two children and wife of 34 years. Mantooth’s son graduated from Truman State University and is on track to get his graduate degree from Boston University. His daughter graduated from Missouri State University with a degree in animation.

Additional reporting contributed by Therasia Brautigam, Jordan Esry and Dylan Okenfuss. 

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